Our Ramsay Hunt Syndrome Main Article provides a comprehensive look at the who, what, when and how of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

Definition of Ramsay Hunt syndrome

Ramsay Hunt syndrome: A herpes virus infection of the geniculate nerve ganglion that causes paralysis of the facial muscles on the same side of the face as the infection. The geniculate ganglion is a sensory ganglion associated with the VIIth cranial nerve.

The Ramsay Hunt syndrome is usually associated with a rash and blisters.

The syndrome is named for the pre-eminent 20th-century American neurologist James Ramsay Hunt (1872-1937). One common error in writing his name is to spell Ramsay as Ramsey and another common error is to put a hyphen between the Ramsay and the Hunt. There is none.

There are three variations or types of Ramsay Hunt syndromes, including:

Including:

  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome I: A disorder characterized by myoclonus and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, especially intention tremor and ataxia, and occasional tonic-clonic seizures. Also known as myoclonus and ataxia. Described by Ramsay Hunt in 1921.

  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome II: This is far and away the best known syndrome associated with Ramsay Hunt's name. It is due to a herpes virus infection of the geniculate nerve ganglion that causes paralysis of the facial muscles on the same side of the face as the infection.

  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome III: Occupational compression neuritis of the deep palmar branch of the ulnar nerve.

Last Editorial Review: 10/8/2012

Search MedTerms:



Back to MedTerms online medical dictionary A-Z List
Pill Identifier Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill finder tool on RxList.


STAY INFORMED

Get the Latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!