Definition of Vocal cord

Vocal cord: One of two small bands of muscle within the larynx. These muscles vibrate to produce the voice. The vocal cords form a "V" inside the larynx, a 2-inch-long, tube-shaped organ in the neck:

Thyroid Gland illustration - Vocal cord
We use the larynx when we breathe, talk, or swallow. Its outer wall of cartilage forms the area of the front of the neck referred to as the "Adams apple."

Each time we inhale (breathe in), air goes into our nose or mouth, then through the larynx, down the trachea, and into our lungs. When we exhale (breathe out), the air goes the other way. When we breathe, the vocal cords relax and air moves through the space between them without making a sound.

When we talk, the vocal cords tighten up and move closer together. Air from the lungs is forced between them and makes them vibrate, producing the sound of our voice. The tongue, lips, and teeth form this sound into words.

The larynx is also sometimes called the voice box.


Last Editorial Review: 8/28/2013

Search MedTerms:


Back to MedTerms online medical dictionary A-Z List
Pill Identifier Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill finder tool on RxList.