Leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic (cont.)

Bone marrow transplantation is used to replace the bone marrow with healthy bone marrow. First healthy marrow is then taken from another person (a donor) whose tissue is the same as or almost the same as the patient's. The donor may be a twin (the best match), a brother or sister, or a person who is otherwise related or not related. The patient (recipient) then has their bone marrow destroyed with high dose chemotherapy with or without radiation. The healthy marrow from the donor is given to the patient through a needle in the vein, and the marrow replaces the marrow that was destroyed. A bone marrow transplant using marrow from a relative or from a person who is not related is called an allogeneic bone marrow transplant. A greater chance for recovery occurs if the doctor chooses a hospital that does more than five bone marrow transplantations per year.

The overall chance of recovery (the long-term prognosis) depends on the subtype of AML and the patient's age and general health.


Last Editorial Review: 9/20/2012

Search MedTerms:



Back to MedTerms online medical dictionary A-Z List
Pill Identifier Tool

Need help identifying pills and medications?
Use the pill finder tool on RxList.


STAY INFORMED

Get the Latest health and medical information delivered direct to your inbox!